Hi there!

I’m Rosie, Merton JCR’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer and Questioning Representative. My job is to look after the interests of the LGBTQ people in college. Looking after the interests of LGBTQ people in college has three main facets: welfare, social and campaigning. It is mainly the job of the JCR’s LGBTQ representative to make sure these needs are being met; however, college staff and other students play a big role too!

On the welfare front,

Merton is lucky enough to have an amazing welfare system which is (honestly) the envy of other colleges. At the top are people like the Chaplain, the College Nurse and Welfare Dean, who you can read about on other pages. At the JCR level are your esteemed Male and Female Welfare Reps and their committee of Peer Supporters, including me. We’re here for you to go to if you’re having any problems, stress, issues, drama or just if you fancy a chat, and we will keep anything you say in complete confidence. Don’t feel limited by our ‘job descriptions’; I’m happy to talk about anything, not just what relates to gender identity or sexuality, and conversely if you’d rather talk to some other peer supporter about LGBTQ stuff feel free. I can also keep you discreetly supplied with condoms, lube and any other sexual health provisions you might need.

Merton was one of the first colleges to update its policy on transgender students; there is now a supportive framework in place for trans students wishing to come out and transition, with plenty of welfare support available along the way.

Socially speaking,

As a medium-to-small college, it can sometimes be hard to muster up many LGBTQ people or find any to hang out with. So on the other side of my role I’ll be running LGBTQ events throughout the year within Merton or with a few other colleges. Over the last year there’ve been successful LGBTQ formals, dinners out in the city and picnics; let me know if you have ideas/requests for other events, or particular colleges you want us to team up with. Non-LGBTQ people are welcome at all such events too, of course. Keep a look out for emails.

As for campaigning,

Merton is a very welcoming, accepting college, with no particular political leaning. This tolerant culture makes it a great environment in which to introduce students to important issues and ideas. University is a time when a lot of young people, from different backgrounds and cultures, come together and may be confronted with LGBTQ issues for the first time. In my role as LGBTQ rep, I will do my best to ensure questions are answered and discussions are started. In the coming year, this will hopefully include speaker events, cake sales (donating to charity and getting sweets and information in return!), and collaborations with various college societies. If you have any LGBTQ-related questions or just want to chat generally about LGBTQ stuff, feel free to come to me!

Wait! There’s more!

Crazy as it sounds, Oxford is not in fact limited to what Merton has to offer. First and foremost in this direction is the LGBTQSoc, the university-wide LGBTQ society. They run events ranging from interesting talks and careers events through weekly brunches to the ever-popular cheap drinks on Tuesday nights. Visit their website ( to sign up to their newsletter and see what’s on. LGBTQSoc has two welfare officers who can also be contacted in confidence. OUSU has an LGBTQ campaign which is the more politically-active side of Oxford LGBTQ life. Oxford Pride parade happens at the end of Trinity, for a rare glimpse at an LGBTQ event not dominated by students. I’ll be doing my best to make participating in university-wide LGBTQ stuff less daunting, but if you’re interested in an event and would like a friendly face with you, just let me know!

More generally,

Oxford is a fairly awesome place to be LGBTQ. College and the University are hugely tolerant places, as is the wider city (in the unlikely event that you do encounter any problems, please let me know in confidence). In terms of going out, Oxford’s most popular LGBTQ club nights are held at Plush, on Park End Street. The club is always well-attended by Merton students of all sexual orientations, particularly on Friday nights!


Merton is a brilliant place to be LGBTQ. Our inclusive culture and institutional support make Merton attentive to the needs of LGBTQ students. Merton’s LGBTQ students have many ways of expressing themselves, from the termly Welfare and Equality Forums in which college members ranging from JCR reps to the Warden meet to discuss progress and ways forward, to the friendly socials with other colleges. University is a great time to embrace freedom and to discover your identity; we hope you choose to do that here.